DAY 1 - 13TH NOVEMBER

 

DAY 2 -14TH NOVEMBER

 

9:00am - 9:45am 
VIP Keynote Address
Changes in the Judiciary That Have Come With A New Government - What Can Be Expected From Everyone

YAA Tan Sri Datuk Seri Panglima Richard Malanjum
Chief Justice of Malaysia



10:15am - 11:15am
The Return of the Sales & Service Tax (SST)

With the change of the tax format from goods & services to sales & services in a span of a few years, what can be expected across all industries in the adjustment period and the compliance period. Is there a change in the cost of doing business? Is the change a bane or a boon?


S. Saravana Kumar, Partner, Lee Hishammuddin Allen & Gledhill

11:15am - 12:15pm

The Companies Act 2016: Impact & Compliance

A look at practical issues faced by organisations since the implementation of the enhanced Companies Act 2016.

Edmund Bon, Head of Chambers, AmerBON Advocates


12:15pm - 1:00pm  
Complying with the GDPR to Achieve Low Risk
The GDPR and industry standards demand that companies create data inventories highlighting important aspects of consumer data and where the data is located. Increasingly, in-house counsel must assist in data mapping and maintaining the data register so that the company can perform an audit to ensure compliance with global standards. In this session, the nuances of GDPR compliance are discussed.

Tom Reynolds, Partner , Trowers Hamlin

Cassandra Lim , Partner , Trowers Hamlin



2:00pm - 3:15pm 
Panel Discussion:
A CEO's Expectations On His Legal Team


According to some chief executives, their legal departments are one part of their business they consider the greatest value drivers. In the past decade, a cadre of innovative executives have set about transforming their legal departments from cost centres to value centres, not only by introducing new efficiencies to the delivery of legal services, but also by using new financial tools to unlock latent value in legal claims. This panel gives a glimpse into what CEO's desire and expect from their GC's and the rest of the team.

Datuk Syed Ahmad Alwee Alsree, Group Executive Director, Cahya Mata Sarawak Berhad

Harry Jaila, Senior Legal Counsel and Company Secretary, Prince Court Medical Centre

Zurina (Gina) Abdul Rahim, Vice President, Head of Group Legal & Compliance, Ranhill Capital


3:30pm - 4:15pm 
Legal Operations: The Leverage To Build Trust With The Board
The degree of involvement of the GC in meetings of the board and its committees has risen continually in recent years. This trend is now stronger also across developed nations, where GCs have significantly more often become members of the executive management team, thereby interacting regularly and closely with the board. Besides offering legal expertise and advising on risk exposure, liability, compliance, and governance, these GCs take a broader view that encompasses the company's reputation and integrity. In Malaysia, with differing cultures within and beyond the boardroom, it is a different kettle of fish - how do you take on this role and balance between gaining the board's trust and protecting the organisation across many fronts.




9:00am - 10:00am
Corporate Internal Investigations: The Best & Worst Things To Do
Companies are being scrutinised today as never before. Government, private and government-linked companies alike are examined and investigated. Frequently, corporate scrutiny focuses on compliance issues, but today the scrutiny extends beyond the organisation, but also to the employees. This session covers a few situations of fraudulent activities and the do's and don'ts in investigating these situations internally first.

Bahari Yeow Tien Hong,
Partner, Lee Hishammuddin Allen & Gledhill

10:00am - 11:00am
How a General Counsel can use Artificial Intelligence To Drive Value

The buzz word in many organisations apart from technological advances is driving value. There are activities in daily work is repetitive where changes are implemented over a reasonable timeframe. This is where the exploration of automating of these activities continues, as it is shown that humans think and machines learn. In a legal department, how much of your daily activities can be learnt and how much needs a thought process. What can be pushed to machines and what can't in the quest for efficiency and driving value in today's workplace.

Dr. Jasmine Begum, Director, Legal, Corporate and Government Affairs, Microsoft Malaysia and New Markets


11:30am - 12:30pm 
Your Company Has Been Hacked: An Interactive Data Breach Simulation
Generally, the first reaction to a breach is to look towards the IT department to fix things before other stakeholders start reacting in a domino-like manner. At the speed of attacks and recovery today, all stakeholders in a breach need to act simultaneously and as quickly as possible. Watch how in this data breach simulation.


Krishna Rajagopal, CEO, AKATI Consulting Group


2:00pm - 3:00pm  
Corporate Reputation Recovery
In a world where the speed of communication is chasing the speed of light, there are risks and benefits. For an organisation in the public eye, all activities have to be prepared to be scrutinized on some degree. One mishap, one accident, one mistake - it just takes one is enough to cause serious damage in this "social" world. The corporate communications team will be the frontliners scrambling to rectify what can be, but what needs to happen behind the scenes to make this process a holistic one in saving your organisation's reputation.


Stefanie Braukmann General Manager,
Strategic Public Relations Group


3:15pm - 4:15pm 
The Legal Department: A Contract Process or Risk Management
The legal department must find ways to both manage contract risks and increase contracting productivity on a limited budget. The legal department are often flooded with contract requests. Sales people, business managers and executives mutter about lawyers being the "business interruption team", while the general counsel needs to balance between competing objectives - fast contracts and careful risk management. No legal department wants to be the bottleneck for contracts, so how do they increase productivity without compromising legal risk management? Is technology the answer, or is there more that can be done?